geology of disney

The Geology of Disney’s Animal Kingdom

Think there’s no geology behind theme parks? Think again! In this video, I’ll teach you about the real-life geology behind popular attractions at Disney’s Animal Kingdom. Learn about the formation of the Himalaya from Expedition Everest, the End-Cretaceous mass extinction from Dinosaur and the sandstone peaks of the Zhangjiajie National Forest Park from Pandora’s floating mountains! If… Continue reading The Geology of Disney’s Animal Kingdom

Glacial, sedimentary, structure, wisconsin

Glaciated breccia: A three-part rock story

This piece of glaciated breccia from the Brussels Hill meteorite impact structure in Brussels, Wisconsin is probably one of my favorites in my collection. It’s not the oldest, nor is it necessarily the prettiest, but it holds one of the best stories. This rock began its life ~440 million years ago during the Silurian Period.… Continue reading Glaciated breccia: A three-part rock story

structure, volcanology

Meteorite Impact or Maar?

Looking at the two images above, they appear quite similar: both are of very large (~1 mile wide), nearly perfectly circular craters in the ground. However, one was formed by a meteorite impact and the other is a maar formed by an explosive volcanic eruption. Think you can figure out which one is which? From just… Continue reading Meteorite Impact or Maar?

geology of disney

The geology behind Disney/Pixar’s “The Good Dinosaur”

The trailer for the new Disney/Pixar movie “The Good Dinosaur” begins by asking the simple question, “What if the asteroid that destroyed the dinosaurs missed?” As a geologist, my immediate answer to the question was, “Well, the dinosaurs still probably would have died out.” Most public knowledge of the End-Cretaceous mass extinction 65 million years ago involves… Continue reading The geology behind Disney/Pixar’s “The Good Dinosaur”

structure, wisconsin

Crater Hunters Find New Clues to Ancient Impact Storm

The Earth will never catch up to the moon (let’s hope), but the number of Ordovician craters may soon takeoff. That’s because it’s easier and cheaper than ever to sniff out the shocked minerals that confirm an impact. My work on my impact site, Brussels Hill in Wisconsin, is featured in this article, which is… Continue reading Crater Hunters Find New Clues to Ancient Impact Storm