geology of disney, tectonics

Could an Earthquake Destroy Disneyland?

  Disneyland may be one of the happiest places on Earth, but it’s also smack in the middle of California earthquake country. The San Andreas fault runs through nearly the entirety of California and has produced many great earthquakes. The San Andreas fault defines a tectonic boundary between the Pacific Plate and the North American… Continue reading Could an Earthquake Destroy Disneyland?

geology of disney, karst

Could a Sinkhole Swallow Walt Disney World?

Sinkholes are all too common of an occurrence in Florida, frequently swallowing cars and houses. The state of Florida has so many sinkholes because it is a karst landscape, composed primarily of limestone bedrock. So what are the odds that a sinkhole appears at Walt Disney World? What if I were to tell you there’s… Continue reading Could a Sinkhole Swallow Walt Disney World?

geology of disney

The Geology of Disney’s Animal Kingdom

Think there’s no geology behind theme parks? Think again! In this video, I’ll teach you about the real-life geology behind popular attractions at Disney’s Animal Kingdom. Learn about the formation of the Himalaya from Expedition Everest, the End-Cretaceous mass extinction from Dinosaur and the sandstone peaks of the Zhangjiajie National Forest Park from Pandora’s floating mountains! If… Continue reading The Geology of Disney’s Animal Kingdom

geology of disney

The Geology of Disneyland

Even before I finished my first geology class, I (jokingly) told people that I was going to be a Spanish-speaking geologist at Disney World. While the rocks of Disney may not exactly be real, we can still learn about the geologic formations they take their inspiration from. Here’s a look at a few of the… Continue reading The Geology of Disneyland

geology of disney

The geology behind Disney/Pixar’s “The Good Dinosaur”

The trailer for the new Disney/Pixar movie “The Good Dinosaur” begins by asking the simple question, “What if the asteroid that destroyed the dinosaurs missed?” As a geologist, my immediate answer to the question was, “Well, the dinosaurs still probably would have died out.” Most public knowledge of the End-Cretaceous mass extinction 65 million years ago involves… Continue reading The geology behind Disney/Pixar’s “The Good Dinosaur”