Blog, GSA, mars

Rocks on Floor of Jezero Crater, Mars, Show Signs of Sustained Interactions with Water

via Rocks on Floor of Jezero Crater, Mars, Show Signs of Sustained Interactions with Water Portland, Ore., USA: Since the Perseverance rover landed in Jezero crater on Mars in February, the rover and its team of scientists back on Earth have been hard at work exploring the floor of the crater that once held an… Continue reading Rocks on Floor of Jezero Crater, Mars, Show Signs of Sustained Interactions with Water

mars

Mars | Hemispheric Dichotomy

The most significant crustal feature on Mars is the hemispheric dichotomy–a physiographic divide between the southern hemisphere (heavily cratered highlands) and the northern hemisphere (relatively smooth plains). The southern highlands cover ~2/3 of Mars and are ~2–4 km higher than the northern lowlands. This area is composed of heavily cratered, relatively old geologic units mainly… Continue reading Mars | Hemispheric Dichotomy

mars, volcanology

Volcanism on Mars

Mars is home to Olympus Mons (pictured above), the largest volcano in the solar system. Rising 21-24 km from the surrounding area, Olympus Mons is the dominant spot in the Tharsis region, which is the largest topographic feature on the planet. The Tharsis volcanic province covers close to 25% of the planet’s surface and houses… Continue reading Volcanism on Mars

mars

Marsday Tuesday

Welcome to a new series, “Marsday Tuesday!” Tuesday is named after Mars (the Latin name is dies Martis “day of Mars”), so each week on Tuesday, we’ll be sharing some important features, interesting research developments, and factoids on our friendly solar system neighbor, Mars! Let’s start off with a basic Mars breakdown to see how similar/different it… Continue reading Marsday Tuesday